2021 AMS Presentations Featuring ARM Data

 
Published: 7 January 2021

Editor’s note: Attendees of the virtual 2021 American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting can view posters, presentations, and recordings until April 15.

2021 virtual American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting logoWith the 2021 American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting going virtual, we want to make it easy for you to find ARM-relevant science during the meeting.

Below is a list of ARM-related AMS meeting highlights (all times Eastern; AMS login might be required to view abstract pages). Follow us on Twitter (@armnewsteam) and Facebook (@arm.gov) for a real-time guide to relevant activities using the hashtag #ARMAMS.

Go here to find more ARM-related presentations and posters, as well as sessions, talks, and posters related to Atmospheric System Research (ASR).

Add your presentation here to be featured on the ARM or ASR presentation web pages.

ARM is also hosting a virtual AMS booth, where you will be able to chat with ARM Technical Director Jim Mather and featured guests during the week of January 11–15 at 11:30 a.m. Eastern each day. After you log in to the AMS virtual meeting platform, you can find the ARM booth by clicking to enter the Exhibit Hall and searching for “Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) User Facility.”

Click Below to View:

Town Halls

ARM-Related Town Halls

Other DOE Earth and Environmental Systems Sciences Division Town Halls

Related Interagency Town Halls

Keynotes and Invited Oral Presentations

Please note: Most presentations are scheduled to run for five minutes, so the full session times are listed below for planning purposes.

Aerosol and Cloud Experiments in the Eastern North Atlantic (ACE-ENA)

Eastern North Atlantic atmospheric observatory
ARM’s Eastern North Atlantic atmospheric observatory provided ground-based measurements for the ACE-ENA campaign in summer 2017 and winter 2018. ARM also deployed its Gulfstream-159 (G-1) aircraft for the campaign.

For a better understanding of aerosols and low clouds in the remote marine environment, ACE-ENA used measurements from ARM’s Eastern North Atlantic observatory in the Azores and data from ARM’s now-retired Gulfstream-159 (G-1) research aircraft. The campaign took place during two intensive operational periods in summer 2017 and winter 2018.

ACE-ENA data are helping researchers learn more about topics such as the budget of cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer, cloud and drizzle microphysics, and the effects of aerosols on marine low clouds and precipitation in the region.

Please note: Most presentations are scheduled to run for five minutes, so the full session times are listed below for planning purposes.

ORAL SESSION—Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Warm Clouds; Aerosol, Clouds, and Precipitation, and Their Interactions During DOE ACE-ENA IOPs
Tuesday, January 12, 1–2 p.m. (Session 5 during the 13th Symposium on Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions)
Co-Chairs: Xiquan Dong, University of Arizona; Zhaoyi Shen, California Institute of Technology; Youtong Zheng, University of Maryland, College Park

Reported ARM Presentations:

POSTER—665 – Vertical Variation of Entrainment-Mixing Mechanisms in Stratocumulus Clouds. Sinan Gao, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology.
Wednesday, January 13, 2–3:30 p.m.

POSTER—676 – Chemical Composition and Ice Nucleation of Ambient Aerosol From Ground and Airborne Measurements Over the Eastern North Atlantic. Peiwen Wang, Stony Brook University.
Wednesday, January 13, 2–3:30 p.m.

Cloud, Aerosol, and Complex Terrain Interactions (CACTI)

CACTI during flight
During the 2018–2019 CACTI campaign, ARM collected data on properties of clouds over Argentina’s Sierras de Córdoba mountain range, seen in this aerial shot. Photo is by Jason Tomlinson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

From October 2018 through April 2019, CACTI collected ground and aerial data to explore the life cycles of convective clouds in Argentina’s Sierras de Córdoba mountain range. This area is said to spawn the biggest thunderstorms in the world. The campaign featured the first deployment of the second-generation C-Band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar, which delivers slice-like flat images of the atmosphere. CACTI ran concurrently with Remote sensing of Electrification, Lightning, And Mesoscale/microscale Processes with Adaptive Ground Observations (RELAMPAGO), a campaign funded largely by the National Science Foundation.

With 80 days of deep convection observed, CACTI represents a new wealth of measurements on cloud dynamics and microphysics, ambient thermodynamic and kinematic and surface conditions, and properties of aerosols. The next scenario of focus for the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) activity will be deep convection during CACTI.

Please note: Most presentations are scheduled to run for five minutes, so the full session times are listed below for planning purposes.

ORAL SESSION—Mesoscale Symposium: Mesoscale–Microscale Interactions
Monday, January 11, 1–2 p.m. (Session 2 during Mesoscale Processes Across Scales: Engaging With Communities in the Physical and Social Sciences)
Co-Chairs: Stephen W. Nesbitt, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Daniel J. Kirshbaum, McGill University

CACTI Session Presentations:

POSTER—323 – Evaluation of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Deep Convective Clouds During CACTI. Peter G. Veals, University of Utah.
Monday, January 11, 2–3:30 p.m.

POSTER—333 – Evaluation of Simulated Atmospheric and Cloud Microphysical Effects on Deep Convective Upscale Growth. Zhixiao Zhang, University of Utah.
Monday, January 11, 2–3:30 p.m.

ORAL PRESENTATION—10.6 – Ice-Nucleating Particles in Midlatitude Continental Regions of North America, South America, and Europe. Paul J. DeMott, Colorado State University.
Thursday, January 14, 10:30–11:30 a.m.

Measurements and Modeling of Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Ice-Nucleating Particles

R/V Polarstern and ice camp during MOSAiC
Taken in June 2020, this photo overlooks the icebreaker R/V Polarstern and the MOSAiC ice camp. Photo is by Lianna Nixon, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), particles on which water vapor can condense to form cloud droplets or ice particles, deeply influence aerosol-cloud interactions and subsequent earth system effects. Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) can originate from sea spray, soot from biomass burning, bacteria, fungi, or carbon-rich organic dust generated during tilling and harvesting agricultural land.

Measurements of INPs and CCN are sparse, contributing to large uncertainties in models of global earth system change. Two sessions at AMS will focus on measurements and modeling of INPs and CCN.

Please note: Most presentations are scheduled to run for five minutes, so the full session times are listed below for planning purposes.

ORAL SESSION—Measurements and Modeling of CCN and INP. Part I
Thursday, January 14, 10:30–11:30 a.m. (Session 10 during the 13th Symposium on Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions)
Co-Chairs: Ottmar Moehler, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology; Naruki Hiranuma, West Texas A&M University; Isabelle Steinke, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Reported ARM Presentations:

ORAL SESSION—Measurements and Modeling of CCN and INP. Part II; Advances in Observational and Modeling Studies of the Role of Mineral Dust in the Earth System
Thursday, January 14, 1–2 p.m. (Session 11 during the 13th Symposium on Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions)
Co-Chairs: Hongbin Yu, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Bing Pu, University of Kansas; Isabelle Steinke, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Reported ARM Presentation: