The ARM Aerial Facility has purchased a Bombardier Challenger 850 regional jet to expand ARM’s scientific data collection capabilities. It will replace the retired Gulfstream-159 (G-1) twin turboprop research aircraft, which served ARM from 2009 to 2018.

ARM has also deployed multiple aircraft platforms from outside the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to address diverse science requirements.

Challenger 850

The Bombardier Challenger 850 will expand ARM’s scientific data collection capabilities.

The Bombardier Challenger 850, which is owned by DOE and will be operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE, is expected to be ready for its first ARM campaign by fiscal year 2022 or 2023. It will be modified from its current business jet configuration to accommodate ARM instrumentation, both within and outside the aircraft.

The Challenger 850 will allow for additional types of aerial sampling, with more power to climb, longer endurance, and a higher maximum altitude allowing, for example, the study of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds.

Gulfstream-159 (Retired)

Using a full suite of instruments, the G-1 obtained in situ data sets during field campaigns.

Owned by Battelle Memorial Institute since 1988 and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE, the Gulfstream-159 (G-1) served as an airborne atmospheric research laboratory for DOE and other users. Previous G-1 campaign data remain available in the ARM Data Center.