Research Highlights

Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM Research Highlights can be accessed using the sorting buttons at right.

To send in a research highlight, please use the submittal form.

The Spectroscopic Foundation of Radiative Forcing of Climate by Carbon Dioxide

Jul 21, 2016 Funded By: ASR

We explored the state-of-the-science of how rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations warm the climate system through radiative forcing caused by spectroscopic absorption features. We found that uncertainties in the absorption line parameters and understanding of the shape of CO2 lines, both of which are important for CO2 radiative forcing, are much smaller than the actual forcing.

Read more

Field Testing the Next-Generation of Radiosondes

Jul 21, 2016 Funded By: ARM

During 3-8 June 2014, an intercomparison study of Vaisala radiosondes RS92 (the current ARM instrumentation) and RS41 (next generation) was undertaken at the ARM SGP site. The results indicate that the sounding measurements generally agree well within manufactured-defined uncertainties with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where evaporative cooling impacts are mitigated for the [...]

Read more

Trace Gas Removal by Deep Convective Storms

Jul 20, 2016 Funded By: ARM ASR

Deep convective storms have a large impact on the climate by sending atmospheric trace gases high into the atmosphere where they participate in particle formation and ozone formation that affect the amount of sunlight, or radiative energy, that passes through the atmosphere to Earth’s surface. Understanding how storms, or convective systems, transport trace-gas concentrations to [...]

Read more

Observing the Amazon: the Role of Time and Place in Cloud Measurements

Jul 20, 2016 Funded By: ARM ASR

Research led by Department of Energy scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory laid the groundwork for future explorations of the Green Ocean Amazon, GOAmazon, 2014/15 field campaign data sets by documenting the variability in space and time of deep convection around the field campaign surface sites distributed upwind and downwind of Manaus, Brazil. Understanding the [...]

Read more

Capturing Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in a Coupled-Model System Compared to Observation

Jul 20, 2016 Funded By: ARM ASR

Current climate models still have large uncertainties in estimating biogenic (naturally emitted) trace gases, which can significantly affect atmospheric chemistry and secondary aerosol formation that ultimately influence the capacity of aerosol particles to affect Earth’s energy balance (aerosol radiative forcing) and air quality. These uncertainties result from many factors, including uncertainties in land-surface processes (exchanges [...]

Read more